Alabama's Heritage Mounds

Archive for the ‘Oxford Exchange, Mound Site’ Category

Anniston Star – UA expert Mound is still there

OXFORD — A University of Alabama archaeologist Tuesday told the City Council natural forces created a stone mound that was the source of controversy in 2009, contradicting a report he signed last year, which claimed the mound was likely made by human hands about 1,000 years ago.

During the regular meeting of the Oxford City Council Tuesday Robert Clouse, director of the Office of Archaeological Research at the University of Alabama and the director of the University of Alabama Museums, tried to answer questions about the mound behind the Oxford Exchange and the apparent removal of another mound at the historic Davis Farm site nearby.

Anniston Star – UA professor defends claims about Oxford mound

OXFORD — A University of Alabama archaeologist Wednesday said more investigation had led him to believe natural forces created a pile of stones that an earlier report bearing his signature said had been erected by humans hundreds of years ago.

The stone mound was at the center of a dispute last year that saw the City of Oxford back away from plans to level the mound to use dirt beneath it for fill at a construction site at the nearby Oxford Exchange.

Robert Clouse, director of the Office of Archaeological Research at the University of Alabama and the director of the University of Alabama Museums, said in an e-mail to The Star “the discrepancy between the two reports is the result of additional information gathered from actual on-site review of the make-up of the mound and additional research into the geological events surrounding the gradual disintegration of the makeup of the mountain.”

The Law and American Indian burial mound protection–alabama laws

Aboriginal mounds and burials are covered in Citation: Aboriginal Mounds, Earthworks and Other Antiquities (Alabama Code §41-3-1 to §41-3-6); Alabama Cemetery and Human Remains Protection Act (93-905); Burials (Alabama Historical Commission Chapter 460-x-10). The Aboriginal Mounds, Earthworks and Other Antiquities Act claims state ownership of all antiquities in the state including mounds, prehistoric burials; prehistoric and historic forts and earthworks; and the materials contained within these resources. Non-state residents are prohibited from excavating these resources although private land owners may allow a non-resident to excavate mounds and burials on private lands so long as the artifacts remain in the state.

Anniston Star – State Senate considers bill to protect Indian burial sites

A proposed law that would strengthen protection for American Indian burial sites, including recently discovered ancient remains in Oxford and a stone mound nearby, is moving through the state Senate.

State Sen. Wendell Mitchell, D-Luverne, introduced the bill for its first reading Jan. 12 in the Senate Committee of Government Affairs. Two days later, the bill received its required second reading and is awaiting another reading on the Senate floor.

“It’s moving as fast as you can move,” Mitchell said.

He said the bill has faced no opposition and he expects that trend to continue in the Senate.

Once the bill makes it through the Senate, it must go through the entire reading process again in the House. Once approved there, it will be sent to Gov. Bob Riley’s office for signage into law.

Mitchell said he did not know how long the entire process might take.

Anniston Star – UA archaeologist to release report on mound <–click for details—<

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A University of Alabama archaeologist says he will release a report stating his case that a stone mound in Oxford was created by natural forces and not by American Indians centuries ago, as was indicated in a report he signed last year.

Robert Clouse, director of the Office of Archaeological Research at the University of Alabama and director of the University of Alabama Museums, said in an e-mail that he would send a copy of his latest report to The Star through the post office. In his e-mail, Clouse said the report would state his case on the matter.

UPDATE:

Rob Dunaway

Great news!!! We have a date set for our Awareness and Preservation of Sacred Sites and Native American Heritage Day. The city of Jacksonville is EXCITED that we are going to use the square to educate families and children about the importance of sacred sites and Native American culture. The event is now scheduled and in the books for March 13th (9am -3pm).
—–

Okay folks!

If you need further information write me or visit this site:
Movement for Protection of Mounds and Cultural Heritage in Alabama

Thank you, for visiting.

— Cathy Ann Abernathy
weavercat@gmail.com



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  • myeagermind: Reblogged this on Lenora's Culture
  • Mashu White Feather: Sgi, Edutsi, I appreciate the advice. Donadagahv'i, Mashu
  • Leonard Lewis: There's a lot of support for this cause....don't give up.....just make sure the response is directed to those responsible for all this mess and make t

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