Alabama's Heritage Mounds

Archive for the ‘Geologic Surveys’ Category

Anniston Star – JSU professor American Indian site is gone

OXFORD — A Jacksonville State University professor says an ancient American Indian site Oxford city officials agreed not to disturb has been destroyed, but he does not know by whom.

City officials claim the site is still intact.

JSU professor of archaeology and anthropology Harry Holstein said the site at the historic Davis Farm property in Oxford contained remnants of an American Indian village and the 3-foot-high base of a once 30-foot-high temple mound, which he says may have contained human remains.

When Holstein visited the site last summer, it was still intact.

But when he returned to the area Monday, he could find no sign of the mound or the village remnants.

The land is now flat, with tire tread marks clearly visible in the dirt.

“It’s been flattened like a pancake,” Holstein said. “There is just grass over it now.”

Holstein believes the temple mound and village are related to a stone mound on a hill behind the Oxford Exchange. Last year workers hired by the city of Oxford attempted to destroy that mound and use the dirt below it as fill for a Sam’s Club. Following protests from local residents and activists, the contractor hired by the city’s Commercial Development Authority apparently stopped work there, and a private landowner says he is now providing fill dirt from his property.

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Anniston Star – Buried in Oxford Secrecy is a damning trait

Of all the troubling aspects surrounding the ongoing saga of Native American sites in Oxford, one has bubbled to the top.

It’s the secrecy.

The discovery of human remains at the Davis Farm site strengthens the concerns of those who have long felt the city’s Native American sites could be burial grounds. Today, that’s no longer supposition.

Where there’s one grave, there may be others.

But it’s impossible to defend the secrecy (by some) and the convenient indifference (by others) that has kept the public in the dark about the activities and findings at the Oxford sites.

It’s appropriate that University of Alabama archeologists monitored the construction of Oxford’s sports park at the Davis Farm location. It’s also comforting to know that city officials are expecting soon a “full report” from the archeologists, The Star reported last week.

Deep Fried Kudzu

Oxford, Alabama Destroying A 1500-Year-Old Indian Mound To Build A Sam’s Club
After writing the post yesterday about how the city of Oxford is destroying a 1500-year-old Indian mound to use it as fill for the building of a Sam’s Club, I just had to go see it for myself.

It towers over the shopping center “Oxford Exchange”

Anniston Star – In the Oxford dirt

Re “American Indian body found at Oxford site” (News article, Jan. 22):

When I was informed of the findings of human remains at the Davis Farm site earlier last week, my first reaction was one of extreme anger.

My anger was soon joined by sorrow that the city of Oxford could be so callous to the feelings of an entire ethnic group. The fact that “a body” was unearthed by a bulldozer and without care or ceremony “reburied” breaks my heart. That “body” was a human being.

As a person who just buried my own mother, it is incomprehensible to me how the city of Oxford could even consider continuing development of that site. Beyond the ethical questions involved, there are also health questions to be answered. Does anyone know how this person died? Was it natural causes or was it disease?

Anniston Star – UA expert Mound is still there

OXFORD — A University of Alabama archaeologist Tuesday told the City Council natural forces created a stone mound that was the source of controversy in 2009, contradicting a report he signed last year, which claimed the mound was likely made by human hands about 1,000 years ago.

During the regular meeting of the Oxford City Council Tuesday Robert Clouse, director of the Office of Archaeological Research at the University of Alabama and the director of the University of Alabama Museums, tried to answer questions about the mound behind the Oxford Exchange and the apparent removal of another mound at the historic Davis Farm site nearby.

Anniston Star – UA professor defends claims about Oxford mound

OXFORD — A University of Alabama archaeologist Wednesday said more investigation had led him to believe natural forces created a pile of stones that an earlier report bearing his signature said had been erected by humans hundreds of years ago.

The stone mound was at the center of a dispute last year that saw the City of Oxford back away from plans to level the mound to use dirt beneath it for fill at a construction site at the nearby Oxford Exchange.

Robert Clouse, director of the Office of Archaeological Research at the University of Alabama and the director of the University of Alabama Museums, said in an e-mail to The Star “the discrepancy between the two reports is the result of additional information gathered from actual on-site review of the make-up of the mound and additional research into the geological events surrounding the gradual disintegration of the makeup of the mountain.”

Alabama Archaeological Society

Destruction of the Oxford Indian Stone Mound
by Richard Kilborn

The State of Alabama has a rich pre-historic past that in some locations is evidenced by the presence of Indian Mounds. These mounds were frequently the ceremonial center for local villages and surrounding regional settlements at which the Native American Indians practiced their social and religious beliefs. Many of the mounds had burials interred within them. Most mounds were constructed of earth carried in baskets from adjacent land but on rare occasions they were made by stacking up stones. Either way, a tremendous amount of time and effort was expended in their construction and is a testament to the importance of these sites to their builders.

Archaeologists and other professionals in interrelated fields have studied some of these sites using a very meticulous and disciplined scientific method of excavation and documenting what was observed in extremely detailed records. This enabled them to gain insights into the state of civilization for the American Indians in a time before the arrival of Europeans. These excavations have helped fill in many blank areas in our knowledge of this land’s prehistoric past but much remains to be learned.

The largest stone mound in the Choccolocco Valley was constructed on the top of a steep 200 foot hill in Oxford Alabama and measures 96 feet long by 48 feet wide with the stones stacked almost 6 feet high. Harry Holstein, Jacksonville State University professor of anthropology and archaeology recorded the site designated as 1Ca636 in 2003 although it had been known of decades earlier. Inhabitants of a major prehistoric Woodland and Mississippian town only hundreds of meters away on the bank of the Choccolocco Creek most likely built this sacred site between 500 to 2,500 years ago.


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  • myeagermind: Reblogged this on Lenora's Culture
  • Mashu White Feather: Sgi, Edutsi, I appreciate the advice. Donadagahv'i, Mashu
  • Leonard Lewis: There's a lot of support for this cause....don't give up.....just make sure the response is directed to those responsible for all this mess and make t

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